#764

"All children have to be deceived if they are to grow up without trauma." - Kazuo Ishiguro

Anonymous Asked
QuestionI really appreciate your prompts and was very excited to see your recent response about how you use these in class. I'm new to teaching writing and have been tasked with a group of struggling high school writers (mostly 9th and 10th graders). I've been searching for the types of grammar/foundational writing skills that you mentioned in your response. Do you have any of those shared? My special education students and I would greatly appreciate your help. Thanks so much! Answer
I don’t have much to share, but I can say a bit more about what I’ve used. I borrow from a ton of different resources to come up with the five-minute lessons I use, and I change it up a lot depending on what my students seem to need. That said, here are the two that come to mind first:
  • Bedford St. Martin’s Top 20 Most Common Errors: really useful, practical grammar instruction.
  • Don and Jenny Killgallon’s sentence composing book is great in that it teaches writing through mimicking great sentences. My students seem to get a lot out of this. I think its effectiveness has to do with mirror neurons. But I could be wrong on that.

#763

Dorothy vs. Alice

update: the image is by Helen Green at dollychops.tumblr.com. Thanks to slashluvr for telling me. 

#762

a poem for a shoe found in the gutter

#761

What the students imagine their teacher’s life is like.

Anonymous Asked
QuestionI just discovered your tumblr and I am in LOVE! I think these are such great ways to strike students' creativity! I just switched grade levels and now teach 8th grade (scary shift from 3rd!). Anyway, I was wondering if you could share how you use these in class. Are they warm ups? Are they whole period activities? Do you collect and grade them? Answer

I use them this way: I do some sort of five or ten minute writing lesson with my students. They learn some style activities and grammar tricks and things like that. Then we do a writing prompt, in which they attempt to implement the writing lesson. They have a little less than ten minutes, and their goal is to write at least half of a page, depending on the handwriting (mine are freshmen and most have no problem with this). After they’re done writing, they go immediately into a time of reading for twenty minutes. During this reading time, I collect their writing work (both the lesson activity and the prompt are on the sheet), and I read it. When they are done with reading time, I then give feedback to the whole class about what they wrote about, and I read a few of them out loud that I really liked and then explain what I liked about them. I try to connect this to the Six Traits or to our standards. Sometimes if I notice a mistake that is being made by a few them, I’ll do a quick bit of instruction on that. But these are not graded for grammar at all. These are a chance to practice the process of moving thoughts from their heads to the paper. They do get a grade in the gradebook on these, but the grade has to do with the standards that are about matching audience to purpose and writing routinely over time. Basically, if they are in the ballpark and gave it a good attempt, then they get a proficient score on their writing prompts. 

I really like this way of doing it because it allows me to read most of them every day and give feedback right away about how it went. Giving feedback, especially timely feedback, is pretty much the best way to help someone’s writing get better. That’s what I’ve discovered anyway. This also creates a culture where they’re trying to write really great things because they want to hear their prompt read to the class — even though I do this anonymously. And for those who struggle… well, every day they get to hear some examples of good writing. Also: I do try to read something from everyone’s out loud every so often.

I used to do more pair sharing and group sharing about them, but I like this method so, so much more. 

They have a folder and all their writing goes into that folder. I have the nicest TA in the world who does all this filing. They can then check out their folder to see what I’ve written there. Also, many of them want to keep working on a certain prompt, so I give them a chance to come back to favorite prompts and work on them to turn them into polished, final pieces.

Hopefully that was enough explanation. Please feel free to ask more questions.

These are some of the prompts from what I’ve posted over at Big Universe lately. These are some of the prompts from what I’ve posted over at Big Universe lately. These are some of the prompts from what I’ve posted over at Big Universe lately. These are some of the prompts from what I’ve posted over at Big Universe lately. These are some of the prompts from what I’ve posted over at Big Universe lately. These are some of the prompts from what I’ve posted over at Big Universe lately. These are some of the prompts from what I’ve posted over at Big Universe lately. These are some of the prompts from what I’ve posted over at Big Universe lately. These are some of the prompts from what I’ve posted over at Big Universe lately. These are some of the prompts from what I’ve posted over at Big Universe lately.

These are some of the prompts from what I’ve posted over at Big Universe lately.

I’m putting together a food unit for this upcoming year, based largely on this unit (warning: links to PDF) by Lauren Goldberg. I’ll also supplement it with some writing prompts to get students thinking about the food they eat and how it affects them. This post is my placeholder for collecting those prompts as I get them made. Here’s what I’ve got so far… teachers beware… many of these were made a long time ago and need some major overhaul…

gross food description

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pure liquid diet forever

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forever carnivore or forever herbivore

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imaginary restaurant menu

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favorite meal, food critic edition

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refrigerator blind date

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pets vs. food

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one of the first writing prompts I ever made, which is really terrible because it just lists a whole bunch of questions about food and it should probably be more focused. Note to self: make this prompt better someday.

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giant bowl of food

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greatest sandwich ever description

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You are what color you eat.

Difference of daily diet across countries

#760

"It takes as much energy to wish as it does to plan." – Eleanor Roosevelt

#759

"books that for one reason or another do not exist, but certainly should…" - Tyler Adam Smith at 100daystyleradamsmith.tumblr.com